How subscriber hierarchies can rebuild your marketing approach: A simple outline for marketing success.

If you're audience is owned by another platform, you're doing it wrong.

How subscriber hierarchies can rebuild your marketing approach: A simple outline for marketing success.
Photo by ETA+ / Unsplash

At the bottom of the hierarchy, you have Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube. Great platforms, but you have little to no control of your audience on them.

I talked about moving up the hierarchy to print subscribers, email subscribers, owned membership sites, and yes, even crypto. It’s your job to move your audience up the hierarchy.

Leverage those social channels, but always treat them like tomorrow they may be gone.

https://www.thetilt.com/audience/dont-build-on-rented-land


I've been enjoying The Tilt articles lately. And their motto is great: "Everything you need to build your own personal content empire. Delivered to you twice a week."

As I was finishing the above article and nodding my head in agreement, the following popped up from Simon Owens:

I'm pretty sure Twitter recently tweaked something in its algorithm so that posts that contain links receive far less reach.

Every single platform eventually does this. They don't like sending free traffic to outside websites. It sucks.

https://twitter.com/simonowens/status/1432517337014538242


Almost in real-time did I see this subscriber (membership?) hierarchy in action.

Which made me think of a line from a previous boss:

If you are the smartest person in the room, you've hired wrong.

In today's creat0r-/content-focused world, we might swap that to:

If your audience is owned by another platform, you're doing it wrong.

Naturally, in the end, we don't really own our audience. We don't even own the platforms we use. Unless we are running our own internet (not likely) and making our own software with patches and updates (more likely), it's difficult to say we own our own platform and audience.

However, we can own our contact data and–for the most part–the distribution and engagement with our audience.

It's why I fully believe in building relationships with current clients (a referral program can bring in net-new clients) through in-person/virtual events coupled with regular updates via email marketing/email newsletters.

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Jamie Larson
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